Feature Stories

Over 700 water professionals attended the Minnesota Water Conference at RiverCentre in downtown St. Paul, October 12 and 13. Plenary presentations and concurrent sessions offered information on topics ranging from the history of Minnesota water policy, corporate/environmental partnerships that benefit water quality and economic bottom lines, and possible solutions to the problem of spent water from the oil fracking process.

For decades, scientists have been researching the cycling and sequestration of carbon in forests and other terrestrial ecosystems. More recently, the process of carbon burial in lakes and other inland waters has caught the attention of water and climate researchers.  

As part of his doctoral research, Water Resource Sciences PhD candidate Robert Dietz has brought a Minnesota focus to the research in his exploration of the long-term historical relationships between land use and carbon burial in 116 Minnesota lakes spanning multiple ecoregions.

The 2016 Climate Adaptation Conference: Transforming Awareness into Action, was held January 28, at the Minneapolis DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel. Over 250 participants attended the conference which through panel discussions and breakout sessions, explored a variety of critical issues affected by climate change, such as water quantity and quality, energy grid resiliency, impacts on tribal communities and effective communication strategies.

The Water Resources Center awarded funding to three research projects for 2016. Researchers will investigate cost-effective methods of controlling sulfate levels in Minnesota waters, protecting well water from arsenic infiltration and creating best management practices for farmers that balance agricultural production and water quality.

You might be surprised at just how much your favorite Minnesota company is doing about climate change. And I’m talking about some big corporate names. Best Buy. General Mills. 3M.

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