Feature Stories

The Water Resources Center awarded funding to three research projects for 2015. The funded research projects include improving the mechanics in drinking water filtration systems, the effect of invasive mussels on the marine environment, and finding a safe balance between the economic boon of mining operations and sulfite damage to wild rice habitat.

With over 30 percent of new neighborhoods installing decentralized wastewater systems, the creation of a simplified, individualized web-based operation manual for individual homeowners or those living within a community septic system only made sense. 

When it comes to environmental issues, most people probably consider scientists to be the thought leaders and change agents. But it is often the world’s great communicators—journalists, essayists, and philosophers, novelists and poets—who succeed in moving society toward shifts in attitude and action that positively impact the environment. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, John Burroughs, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson are among those whose writings have raised awareness about the environmental and conservation challenges that have faced us for decades. 

Through wastewater education and research projects, onsite specialist Sara Heger is making a difference for the environment in her home state of Minnesota and across the country.

Aided by a Water Resources Center grant, University of Minnesota Soil, Water and Climate assistant professor Brandy Toner and professor Ed Nater have been sampling glacial aquifers in west central and south central Minnesota in an effort to map the stratigraphic and mineralogical sources of arsenic in groundwater.

This summer, researchers from the University’s Biotechnology Institute were awarded a $600,000 federal grant to develop technology to treat flowback water. Led by College of Biological Sciences professor Lawrence Wackett, the team includes Alptekin Aksan, professor in the College of Science and Engineering, and Michael Sadowsky, a Water Resources Sciences graduate program professor in the College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences.

Minnesota’s reputation for weather extremes will intensify with climate change, bringing more extreme variation in the drought and flood cycle. And it’s a trend that will have an enormous impact on the state’s water resources management, says climatologist Mark Seeley.

If the plants come back, so will the bugs and the fish and the birds… the goal is to develop an ‘ecological design’ for restoration after the sediments have been cleaned up.

Roughly three years ago, John Nieber of the Department of Bioproducts and Bioengineering and John Gulliver of the Department of Civil Engineering submitted a grant request to the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District (MCWD) and the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization (MWMO) to investigate the lack of water in dry years throughout Minnehaha Creek. Minnehaha Creek is arguably one of the most valued surface water features in the Minneapolis, MN metro area and is heavily used for recreation during the spring, summer, and fall. Flow in Minnehaha Creek is heavily dependent on discharge from the stream’s origin, Lake Minnetonka, the outlet of which is closed during most late summer periods to maintain water elevations in the lake resulting in low- (or no-) flow conditions in the creek. In addition, stormwater runoff entering directly to the creek from the creek’s largely urbanized watershed exacerbates extremes in flow conditions. As a result of these issues, there was interest in enhancing the cultural and ecosystem services provided by Minnehaha Creek through improvements in streamflow regime by reducing flashiness and sustaining increased low-flows.

Throughout Minnesota, cities struggle with the goal of reducing nutrient inputs to urban lakes. The nearly completed Prior Lake Street Sweeping Study took a new look at an old practice, examining the potential of enhanced street sweeping as a source reduction BMP. The study is unique in several aspects: (1) it examined the effect of both percentage tree canopy and sweeping frequency (once, twice, and four times per month); (2) sweeping was done from snowmelt through snowfall, and therefore included autumn leaf fall (most previous studies did not); (3) tree leaves were analyzed separately from the finer sediments; and (4) costs were computed for each of nearly 400 sweeping runs.

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