Minnegram Spring 2014

Director's Corner

Features

  • Roughly three years ago, John Nieber of the Department of Bioproducts and Bioengineering and John Gulliver of the Department of Civil Engineering submitted a grant request to the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District (MCWD) and the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization (MWMO) to investigate the lack of water in dry years throughout Minnehaha Creek. Minnehaha Creek is arguably one of the most valued surface water features in the Minneapolis, MN metro area and is heavily used for recreation during the spring, summer, and fall. Flow in Minnehaha Creek is heavily dependent on discharge from the stream’s origin, Lake Minnetonka, the outlet of which is closed during most late summer periods to maintain water elevations in the lake resulting in low- (or no-) flow conditions in the creek. In addition, stormwater runoff entering directly to the creek from the creek’s largely urbanized watershed exacerbates extremes in flow conditions. As a result of these issues, there was interest in enhancing the cultural and ecosystem services provided by Minnehaha Creek through improvements in streamflow regime by reducing flashiness and sustaining increased low-flows.

  • Historically, the spring issue of Minnegram covered the research projects receiving grants from the USGS as administered by the Water Resources Center (WRC). This year, due to budget uncertainties from the sequestration, as well as feedback from faculty regarding the proposal process, the WRC focused on supporting students working on existing WRC grants. The awards cover the salary portion of a twelve month Graduate Research Assistantship (RA).

    Three principal investigators (PIs) and their USGS-funded projects were chosen to receive the student grants.

  • The wet wipes clogging the equipment that University of Minnesota’s Onsite Sewage Treatment Program researchers use to study septic system effectiveness were the first clue as to why systems serving adult foster homes experience system failure at a greater rate than other residential treatment systems. Results of a study conducted by staff from the University of Minnesota’s Onsite Sewage Treatment Program at six foster homes in Chisago county show that adult foster care homes produce wastewater that is different than typical residential wastewater, with higher levels of contaminates that may contribute to decreased septic system performance. Bleach and other strong cleaning products for example, interfere with organisms required to break down solids in the wastewater.

  • The USGBC of Minnesota approached UMD Continuing Education about developing an online educational course focusing on stormwater management. In response to this request, UMD Continuing Education partnered with Jesse Schomberg from the Minnesota Sea Grant program to design the Stormwater Management in Cold Climates course. While this course was designed for LEED professionals, anyone interested in gaining a better understanding of the issues related to stormwater management will benefit.